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June 29, 2009

Comments

Dave Bernstein

While you and your fellow executives were successful in saving IBM from its near-death experience, it remains a bloated, slow, political organization that succeeds only because its primary competitors are even worse.

Chris Ward

re: Bloatedness and sloth.

Cutting, but I'm not saying you're wrong. If IBM is bloated and slow, then at least IBM is fair with it and that must surely create opportunity for smaller, slimmer, and faster businesses which can take advantage.

Lenovo is one such, with Personal Computers.

I have a suspicion that if someone approached IBM with an offer for the global Lotus SmartSuite franchise, then there is a good chance that the offer would be listened to.

dblwyo

Irving - fair enough observations. As somebody who was at ground zero for the downsizings and the birth of e-business, including being the principal subject expert on two of the four task forces and helping to startup two of the follow-on organizations (Chin's division and TranInd TransConnect) the first two steps were tough but worked. But even Lou admits at the end of his book he struggled with the culture; my experience is that where it was cultural comfortable (bottom of the stack)IBM was capable of great resilience. But Steve Mills has labored mightily to turn SWG into the driving engine of the company and IBM has never cross the gap at the top of the stack on business and applications. I give you this decade's 2-3 failed visions. HOWEVER, and this is critically important, the "Smart Planet" vision plays to IBM's technical and cultural strengths.
If you'd like to see the end-to-end framework on innovation, processes, functions and team design I evolved during all this it was just posted on here:Run For Daylight: Innovation, Innovation, Innovation (URL: http://llinlithgow.com/bizzX/2009/07/run_for_daylight_innovation_in.html)

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