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July 01, 2013

Comments

Paul

Wonderful article thank you.
What I find particularly worrying is that in the near future this technology will allow many cognitive computers to be *right* almost all the time.
This will have profound implications precisely because the machines will be able to make a correct choice without falling in a "bias trap". Human biases are what create opportunities, because not all human beings read and process available information in the same manner and therefore come to different conclusion, which result in different immediate and strategic choices.
Some of these will be successful, to the benefit of their adopters - others will fail, and this failure will benefit another group of individuals.
In the natural domain we all know there is no single biological species which always wins. Sometimes the lion succumbs to a virus, sometimes a colony of microorganisms will die because the local environment has drastically changed.
But what happens when cognitive computing will allow someone to have the benefit of the highest success rate?
This idea makes me cringe to be honest.
I can imagine that the way out will be to have either more and faster computing power - resulting in even shorter boom-bust cycles - or to win by brute force, i.e. by "physically removing" the adversary from the game.

Kind regards

Paul

Matt

Great article. You can see the strong move to cognitive computing at large government departments and agencies. They need to develop appropriate tools that will not only aggregate large amounts of data, but extract useful information and create interfaces that allow for optimum display and use of the data.
Similarly, corporations can adapt the technology to help predict consumer trends and analyze enormous amounts of market data.

One area that I am feel is not yet fully being addressed in this fashion is education. Data-driven computing has the potential to unlock an unprecedented growth in individual education and level the playing field across income classes. The power of cognitive computing in this case is not in the ability to help students solve problems, but rather in the ability of the technology to extract insight into the process of individualized learning. The technology has progressed to the necessary level - how it makes its way into the classroom remains a mystery...

Best Regards,

Matt

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