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December 31, 2012

Comments

Kent Langley

Modes of communication between brains do keep improving over the last couple of million years or so don't they? Our collective tendency to learn from history still seems hobbled. We often seem, as a collective intelligence to self-excise important memories. I'm really hoping that these exabytes of data we are now storing every year and our burgeoning technical capabilities to filter, categorize, analyze, and gain insights from this data will actually lead to greater collective wisdom (not just knowledge) in exponentially shorter amounts of time that it took for humanity to get where we are today. Collectively, we're still just babies with sharp knives.

Some interesting non-fiction books related (at least in my mind) to this subject are "What Technology Wants" by Kevin Kelly and "On Intelligence" by Jeff Hawkins. I haven't read Ray Kurzweill's new book, "How to Create a Mind," yet but will soon. Not sure if explores any of the collective intelligence issues but many brains working together are still just lots of individual brains.

Lastly, I just saw an interesting article on IQ today discussing how our IQ tests don't really mean much possibly. Need to go back and find that one…

SarahSiegel

Was glad to be directed to this post by colleague and friend Jen Okimoto. Am struck by, "groups in which a few people dominated the conversation did not perform as well as those groups where speaking and contributions were more evenly distributed." And am hoping that by expanding where we have "the conversation", there can be less danger of dominant conversationalists, e.g., I've co-produced a number of hybrid learning sessions, where an auditorium of 200-300 meet face to face for a series of technical presentations while in parallel, thousands from up to 59 countries join virtually to watch the sessions over Livestream, including access to a moderated live-chat, where they can express themselves even though they are not in the auditorium...and we have found that often, they are as active, or more active, during Q&A sessions as the people who are F2F.

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